In choosing what auto insurance to purchase, you may be tempted to reduce your expenses by looking for an auto insurance with the lower amount of coverage or by raising your deductibles. While these two factors obviously affect car insurance costs, there are other considerations, some of which are not under your control, that can impact the price of auto insurance premiums.
Insurers don't determine your actual cash value (ACV) settlement based on what you owe, but rather on what the car is worth just prior to the accident. Let's say you owe $20,000 on your new car, but it's only worth about $16,000. If your car is totaled, you might get a settlement check of $16,000 but still owe an additional $4,000 on your loan or lease.
In the U.S., there are only two states where you’re not legally required to carry auto insurance: New Hampshire and Virginia. This, however, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t buy a policy if you live there. Additionally, this means that if you do not have auto insurance in Illinois, you’re not only risking financial trouble but you may also face legal consequences.

Statistically, teen drivers and seniors are more likely to figure in an accident. As such, most insurance companies consider them more risky and expensive to insure compared to other drivers. Younger drivers tend to commit mistakes, such as tunnel vision, distracted driving, or speeding, which may lead to road accidents or put other drivers’ and pedestrians’ safety at risk. On the other hand, seniors age 70 years or older who have poorer eyesight and slower reflexes that impact their driving ability may be charged with higher insurance costs.

Automobile insurance provided by United Services Automobile Association, USAA Casualty Insurance Company, USAA General Indemnity Company, Garrison Property and Casualty Insurance Company, based San Antonio, TX; USAA Limited (UK) and USAA S.A. (Europe), and is available only to persons eligible for P&C group membership. Each company has sole financial responsibility for its own products.


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