The need for helmets isn’t just to keep you alive; it may help you recover damages for injuries to the head. Wearing your helmet may not be the deciding factor to your injury claim, but it shows you’re a responsible motorcyclist. It could also indicate the negligence of the other driver. Insurance companies may also take helmet use into consideration. For example, if you were not wearing a helmet and sustained injuries during an accident, you may have to prove to the insurer that you would still have been injured even with a helmet.
For serious accidents, you want enough insurance to cover a judgment against you in a lawsuit without jeopardizing your personal assets. Therefore, it's a good idea to have the same level of bodily injury coverage for all your cars. You may also want to consider an umbrella policy which provides additional coverage for more serious accidents and lawsuits.
In the U.S., there are only two states where you’re not legally required to carry auto insurance: New Hampshire and Virginia. This, however, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t buy a policy if you live there. Additionally, this means that if you do not have auto insurance in Illinois, you’re not only risking financial trouble but you may also face legal consequences.
Car insurance requirements vary by state. In most states, you are required to have both bodily injury and property damage liability insurance. Some states require coverage to help pay hospital bills and medical expenses for you and your passengers related to injuries from a car accident, no matter who is at fault. Some states require that you protect yourself from uninsured or underinsured motorists. Ask your local independent agent for personal advice about making sure you’re adequately covered.
Statistically, teen drivers and seniors are more likely to figure in an accident. As such, most insurance companies consider them more risky and expensive to insure compared to other drivers. Younger drivers tend to commit mistakes, such as tunnel vision, distracted driving, or speeding, which may lead to road accidents or put other drivers’ and pedestrians’ safety at risk. On the other hand, seniors age 70 years or older who have poorer eyesight and slower reflexes that impact their driving ability may be charged with higher insurance costs.

Underinsured motorist coverage reimburses you, a member of your family, or a designated driver if one of you is hit by an uninsured driver or a driver who doesn’t have sufficient insurance to pay for your total loss. This coverage also offers protection in the event a covered driver is the victim of a hit-and-run or if, as a pedestrian, you are struck by an uninsured or underinsured motorist.
For serious accidents, you want enough insurance to cover a judgment against you in a lawsuit without jeopardizing your personal assets. Therefore, it's a good idea to have the same level of bodily injury coverage for all your cars. You may also want to consider an umbrella policy which provides additional coverage for more serious accidents and lawsuits.

Third-party liability coverage pays damages you cause to others in a covered loss — up to the policy’s limits.  When selecting those limits, it’s important to know the value of assets you want to protect.  Add up the value of everything you own: your primary and vacation homes, savings and investments, cars and recreational vehicles, and any collectibles. Ideally, choose liability limits that are high enough to protect the total value of these assets. 
Car insurance requirements vary by state. In most states, you are required to have both bodily injury and property damage liability insurance. Some states require coverage to help pay hospital bills and medical expenses for you and your passengers related to injuries from a car accident, no matter who is at fault. Some states require that you protect yourself from uninsured or underinsured motorists. Ask your local independent agent for personal advice about making sure you’re adequately covered.
The above is meant as general information and as general policy descriptions to help you understand the different types of coverages. These descriptions do not refer to any specific contract of insurance and they do not modify any definitions, exclusions or any other provision expressly stated in any contracts of insurance. We encourage you to speak to your insurance representative and to read your policy contract to fully understand your coverages.
Gauntlet – These gloves are known for providing the best protection for your hands and wrists. They have a thick reinforcement that defends your hands from impact and scratches. They come in a variety of materials. Some high-end models may have kevlar fiber fabric or carbon fiber armor. Because of their girth, however, it might be a challenge to adapt to driving with them if you’re used to thin gloves or to not using any glove at all.
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