When comparing car insurance quotes, it helps to compare apples to apples; in other words, you want to be sure that the quotes you get are for identical - or at least very similar - auto insurance policies. Once you have a better idea of the type of coverage you’re looking for in a policy, this will be easy. To better understand coverage types start here
Statistically, teen drivers and seniors are more likely to figure in an accident. As such, most insurance companies consider them more risky and expensive to insure compared to other drivers. Younger drivers tend to commit mistakes, such as tunnel vision, distracted driving, or speeding, which may lead to road accidents or put other drivers’ and pedestrians’ safety at risk. On the other hand, seniors age 70 years or older who have poorer eyesight and slower reflexes that impact their driving ability may be charged with higher insurance costs.
Underinsured motorist coverage reimburses you, a member of your family, or a designated driver if one of you is hit by an uninsured driver or a driver who doesn’t have sufficient insurance to pay for your total loss. This coverage also offers protection in the event a covered driver is the victim of a hit-and-run or if, as a pedestrian, you are struck by an uninsured or underinsured motorist.
Collision coverage is generally sold with a separate deductible. Even if you are at fault for the accident, your collision coverage will reimburse you for the costs of repairing your car, minus the deductible. If you're not at fault, your insurance company may try to recover the amount they paid you from the other driver’s insurance company and, if they are successful, you'll also be reimbursed for the deductible.

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Insurance terms, definitions and explanations are intended for informational purposes only and do not in any way replace or modify the definitions and information contained in individual insurance contracts, policies or declaration pages, which are controlling. Such terms and availability may vary by state and exclusions may apply. Discounts may not be applied to all policy coverages.
Texas is a big state and all Texas drivers know that—especially when they get in the car to drive on some of the three-quarters of a million miles of road in the state, the most in the country and 70% more than the number-two state California. This means some long drives between cities, towns and sometimes even neighboring homes, which is why it's important for Texas residents to make sure that both you and your car are protected.
For serious accidents, you want enough insurance to cover a judgment against you in a lawsuit without jeopardizing your personal assets. Therefore, it's a good idea to have the same level of bodily injury coverage for all your cars. You may also want to consider an umbrella policy which provides additional coverage for more serious accidents and lawsuits.
If you have adequate health and life insurance, you may not need a huge car insurance coverage. Generally, your car insurance coverage is the first to be used up if you are involved in a vehicular accident. Then, you may use your health and life insurance policies to pay for medical bills, if applicable. One extension of car insurance policies is Personal Injury Protection (PIP) coverage, which covers your medical expenses, regardless of who is at fault. If you avail of this with your car insurance policy, and you also have life and health insurance policies, you need only take out the minimum PIP coverage.
You can never be too safe on the road, especially if you’re driving a motorcycle. Apart from being exposed to the elements, there’s less protection when you’re involved in a crash. The latest data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHSTA) shows that over 5,286 Americans lost their lives in a motorcycle crash in 2016. This is a 5.1% increase from 2015’s fatalities of about 5,029. The NHSTA also added that motorcycle deaths were about 28 times more frequent than deaths from other vehicles, based on 2016 data.
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